Menu Close

How to Find or Advertise a Microjob

Microjobs are small jobs that require few resources to perform and generate a reasonable profit for the effort. Finding and advertising a microjob should involve using inexpensive or free services that don't detract from the profit made by the microjob.

Use Personal Networks to Advertise

Telling people what services are available, especially to people with many friends or contacts in the industry, also known as "networking", is the easiest, cheapest and simplest way to get clients. Just have the courage to speak up in a suitable forum. A worker mentioning in a staff meeting that she is moonlighting in a microjob is not appropriate, but bringing a diaper bag that she has made to a bridal shower and generating a conversation about baby accessories is appropriate.

Twitter for Microjobs

Other articles, such as Daniel Gansle's article, "Ten Twitter Must Follows for the Job Seeker" focus on Twitter for the general job search, but Twitter is also a powerhouse to list and find microjobs. Simply joining Twitter and searching the tweets for the keywords "job" and the offered service, will turn up some opportunities. Other people have had luck listing the name of the service they offer and the city code, usually the local airport code, to advertise their services. Twitter can get fed directly to a subscriber's cell phone and since subscribing to a Twitter feed is voluntary, it escape the stigma of spam.

Using Posters to Sell Services

 

 

Deciding what to spend on advertising should not cost more than a person would make on the job. Printing up fifty color posters when it will take ten jobs to pay for defeats the "minimal resources use" priniciple of microjobs. Start small and let the jobs pay for the advertising.

Some people, such as pet sitters or handyman services, may find that putting posters up in a high traffic area like a grocery store, coffee shop or community center is enough to find clients. Other people working microjobs find that they need to list their services online or make their own website with the items or services they offer for sale directly from the site.

Find Microjobs on Freelancing Websites

Freelance websites, such as iFreelance and Virtual Vocations, are good sources of microjobs for writers, web workers and programmers, though it helps to be discriminating to get the best jobs. Some of the freelance sites also charge the person who applies to the job, not the job poster, to use the site, so make sure the jobs offered on the freelance site will pay for the cost of joining.

Classified Advertising

 

 

Advertising in a newspaper, even in a small community or commuter newspaper, can be expensive. However, running an online ad in a relevant publication can get an ad directly to the person who needs the service. so it can be worth the expense. Look for newspapers that have an online presence and that run any print ad that appears on their website as well to get the most out of advertising. Any advertising that runs online should include an email address, not a phone number, to decrease the likelihood of getting a phone number harvested by telemarketers. Don't use a service again if there is an increase in spam to the microjob's email address.

Find microjobs or advertise services on Craigslist and Kijiji. A tutor, writer, personal care service provider or a home service provider can easily find clients with a simple free ad. Ads do need to be renewed since some ads will only run for thirty days. Remember to kill the ad if the microjob experience is over. Once a trip is paid for, take down the ad to stop the client requests.

Using Facebook Advertising

Advertising in Facebook is one method to use to get to an online audience. It isn't necessary to have an account on Facebook to run an ad, though it does help to know how Facebook works and to think about what makes a Facebook user click on an ad. Advertisers set a budget for the maximum they will pay for the ad campaign and how much they are willing to pay per click. The higher the per click rate, the more likely the ad will be displayed, but a low campaign budget and a high per click rate means that only a few people will see the ad, and not all viewers are likely to buy. Facebook does screen ads for suitability and will format ads to fit in the small space devoted to ads on Facebook.